"Ponderynge together yestardayes promise, and two-dayes doyng"
(Hall's Chronicle - 1548)

"Goronigl gwyr yr Ynys" (Lewis Glyn Cothi - 1450)

John Donne and John Milton at Midwinter

Lucy’s Day - Midwinter - a dark time
John Donne said in his Nocturnall rhyme-
ing flaskes with unmaskes to reveal
light in the darkness, a glimmer, but real,
a spark of hope at the Solstice, at the turn
of the year as the Sun pauses and fire burns
low at midnight : the yeares and the dayes

and we wait three turns of the earth for the rays
of light to return on a glimmering morn
so we say, this day, a child is born
bringing new life, new hope and the new year
of a new age as John Milton would have us bear
witness to the passing of the yellow-skirted fays
subdued in his Nativity but flighty in his gaze.


Specific references are made in the above to John Donne’s ‘A Nocturnall upon S. Lucies Day’ and John Milton’s ‘Hymn on the Morning of Christ’s Nativity’.